THE GOAL OF NEBRASKA LOW VISION IS TO HELP YOU!

The goal of Nebraska Low Vision is to help persons with low vision that live in Nebraska .

 

Having worked with technology in the blind and visually impaired field since 1990, we know that our products will help you now. We also know that our life-time support is exactly what you deserve.

 

The information below is intended to help you understand more about low vision.

WHAT IS LOW VISION?

What Is Good Vision?

To understand low vision, let’s review what good vision is and how it works. Central vision is the vision we use when we look directly at something. It provides us the most detail to read print, thread a needle, and recognize faces. Peripheral vision is the vision we use around the edges of our central vision, and although it is not as detailed as central vision, it allows us to see a large visual field. When you hear someone say, “I saw that out of the corner of my eye,” that person is referring to using his or her peripheral vision.


What Is Low Vision?

Low vision is defined as visual impairments that are not correctable through surgery or corrected lenses. Low vision causes a reduction in visual acuity, visual field, or both. The term low vision is often used interchangeably with visual impairment. Low vision refers to a loss of vision that may be severe enough to prevent someone from completing daily activities such as reading, cooking, using a computer, or walking outside safely. With the proper help, a person with low vision can learn to complete his or her daily activities and live independently.

PICTURES TO EXPLAIN LOW VISION

Normal Vision

This picture labeled Normal Vision shows four children as seen with 20/20 vision.


The next four pictures have been altered from the first picture to give you an idea of how vision is affected by the most common types of visual impairments. These altered pictures are based on other pictures available to the public that show the same comparison.


The most common types of Low Vision are:

• Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

• Cataract;

• Glaucoma;

• Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP)

 

AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the United States. Macular degeneration gradually affects central vision, and the person may experience blurred, distorted, or dim vision. It is very important for people with macular degeneration to monitor their eyesight carefully and see their eye doctor on a regular basis.  

 

CATARACT

CATARACT

Cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye and causes vision to be blurry. 


Cataracts are the leading cause of visual impairment in the world.


It is important to see your eye doctor for regular eye examinations. Cataract surgery is generally very successful in restoring vision. In fact, it is the most frequently performed eye surgery in the United States.

GLAUCOMA

GLAUCOMA

The goal of Nebraska Low Vision is to help you!


Glaucoma is a complicated disease that leads to progressive, irreversible vision loss.


It is important to see your eye doctor for regular eye examinations. If glaucoma is detected during an eye exam, your eye doctor can prescribe a preventative treatment to help protect your vision.

RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) may appear at any age, but it usually begins in childhood or adolescence. 


At first, the person has trouble seeing in dim light. The visual field gradually narrows, causing tunnel vision. Tunnel vision looks like you are looking through a tube. 



Additional causes of low vision include strokes, diabetic retinopathy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other diseases, such as Stargardt’s, and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).